5 Great photo ideas using the colour pink

5 Great photo ideas using the colour pink

Pink snow and sunset

 

Pink

is a combination of red and white, and sometimes soft hues of orange. Red is one of the primary colours and very bright and stimulating, hence the addition of white produces a soft and warm shade which appeals to our feminine side. However even men have a feminine side and can appreciate the beauty of pink!!

Pink is calm and soft and warm. A predominant shade when the sun sets and when the sun rises, pink is often spell binding in its ability to lighten and soften our thought patterns.

Here are some ideas on how to get the best out of your photography incorporating the colour pink.

 

1. Sunset. I regularly see people gather in various locations to view a sunset. Why because of its beauty and no doubt its tendency to calm and soothe us. A sunset is a great opportunity to visit your favorite photography locations and experiment with settings as the sun goes down. I have learnt to slow my shutter speed as the sun gets lower in the sky.

2. Sunrise is not so frequented by the crowds, perhaps because they are still sleeping. A sunrise has a sharper and crisper element to it, whereas a sunset is more musky and muted. Sunrise does require you to get up early but when I visit the mountains I am never disappointed. So get up early and take a stroll to a good spot to sit and watch the morning light. I am not good at using a tripod, but I do for early morning shots.

3. Pink is often associated with babies, children, girls and clothing and rooms. watch out for shades of pink in homes, and clothing.  And as I said before don’t exclude men, Rick Stein a TV food presenter very often wears a pink shirt and it looks great!

4. Most times in a setting sun I will actually not photograph the sun but will turn in the exact opposite direction and photograph from this angle. In fact most of my shots below are of this type of shot. The pinks are vivid and and slowly turn to a purply blue shade. Timing is critical so be in your location at least an hour to 30 mins before the sun sets.

5. Try slowing your camera shutter speed down to create an even softer effect. Practise and practise again. I constantly check my shots in the view finder and then make any alterations to my camera settings.

 

CHECK THIS OUT a great article by Lisa Michelle Burns on how to achieve those pastel shades in your landscape photography.

 

 

Enjoy the evening hues when you next view the heavens as the sun is setting.

 

 

 

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